Grant Recipients Grants to Artists Visual Arts 2021

Kandis Williams

KandisWilliams
Photo by Dicko Chan.

The funds I received from the FCA grant have proven instrumental in furthering my practice over the last year. After relocating my studio from Los Angeles to NYC, the FCA funds went towards furthering my studio and allowed me to develop my studio team as well as afford the technology that allowed me to prepare for a solo show with prototypes and supplies while simultaneously taking on a number of other projects... Each of the projects I have taken on since the grant have been crucial to the development of my practice and the FCA grant has made this past year’s journey slightly smoother.

- Kandis Williams, February 1, 2022

Biography

Kandis Williams is a visual artist whose practice spans collage, performance, writing, publishing, and curating. She explores and deconstructs critical theory around race, nationalism, authority, and eroticism. Her work focuses on the body as a site of experience which is simultaneously being co-opted as a symbol by the spectator. Drawing from philosophical and psychoanalytic writings, Williams explores the accumulation of forced and aspirational social interaction on the body through the lens of the corporeal, the psychological, and the spectacular simultaneously. Placing original, choreographed performances in dialogue with imagery from mainstream pop culture, Williams aims to take back the unconscious associations by which the human body is distorted into a signifier.

Her collages such as The Rivers of Styxx (2018), The Bathers of Acheron (2018), and Disfiguring traditions (2016) often incorporate images from anthropological textbooks alongside images from contemporary advertising, counterculture celebrities, and dance performances and place them in harmonious geometric compositions that belie their philosophical tensions. Williams’s choreographed performances carry her research on gesture into contexts which confront and subvert unspoken dynamics of perception in lived experience.

Cassandra Press, Williams’s publishing platform, is known for producing anthologies of academic and literary texts organized around charged topics. The press also offers virtual workshops with artists and academics and produces legal documents designed to protect Black artistic producers.

Williams was a featured artist in the Made in L.A. 2020 biennial at the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, CA and The Huntington Library, Art Museum, and Botanical Gardens, San Marino, CA, where she presented a series of large-scale collages alongside earlier works. In 2020, the Institute for Contemporary Art at Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA mounted Kandis Williams: A Field, Williams’s first institutional solo exhibition which featured a site-responsive installation.

Williams has presented solo exhibitions at Printed Matter, Inc., New York, NY (2020); Cooper Cole, Toronto, Canada (2018); WOP Works on Paper, Vienna, Austria (2017); Night Gallery, Los Angeles, CA (2016); and St. Charles, Baltimore, MD (2016), among others. Her ongoing performance series Eurydice, which spans across the mediums of performance, sculpture, painting, photography, and collage, was the subject of an editorial feature in Artforum (2020).

Artist Statement

My practice and pedagogy have always focused on bridging aesthetics and ethics, while considering how isolation and specialization allow racism and other schisms to exist without examination. As an intersectional artist-scholar, my work considers the need for intersectional theorists to bridge gaps between disciplines and discourse, in order to decrypt and develop resistance against the Neoliberal and fascist ideologies that are competing for structural affective and ideological control.

Besides my physical and performance-based output, pedagogy has always been an important part of my broad practice. For a number of years after graduating, I taught classes on video, photo, collage, and bookbinding through many alternative, community-oriented education platforms and non-profits serving primarily underserved students. In more recent years, I have organized countless panels, workshops, and lectures that have aimed to use Black Studies, integrated with ethics and aesthetics, for more dynamic considerations of social consciousness around perceptual tools.

- December 2020

A collage depicting in its center a kneeling figure with wings. Splashes of red and blue are found on the top while the bottom holds small figure cut outs.

Belladonna Atropos. On the one hand, the plant appears to withdraw from a human economy of desire and hovers at the limits of our affective identification. But it also produces profound effects on us, including setting in motion our imagination. This oscillation is not only a defining characteristic of vegetality but functions as a key trait of speculative literature, giving this genre a power and agency that is inherently linked to the vibrancy of plant matter. can all the tight pussy gals step forward?, 2020, Xerox collage and ink on watercolor paper, 80 1/4" x 55 1/2." Photo courtesy of the artist.

A makeshift green field stands in the middle of a white space. Above it a house with blurred glass panels has the image of a red figure in a flower field. Surrounding it wooden panels and glass vases with leaves.

Installation view of Kandis Williams: A Field, at the Institute for Contemporary Art at Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, 2020. Photo by David Hale.

A makeshift green field stands in the middle of a white space, above it a house with blurred glass panels. In front of it closest to the viewer stand pots with long green leaves that have imprinted on them figures and faces.

Installation view of Kandis Williams: A Field, at the Institute for Contemporary Art at Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, 2020. Photo by David Hale.

Teaser for A Field, 2020, single-channel video, sound.

A golden case supports a plant of cotton and small green leaves. Two big leaves stand on the highest and lowest point, on the imprinted various figures.

Detail, Kandis Williams: A Field, 2020. Photo by Paul Salveson.

A plant in a black pot has imprinted on its leaves various patterns such as figures, shoes and tiger fur.

Detail, Kandis Williams: A Field, 2020. Photo by Paul Salveson.

A collage depicting in its center a kneeling figure with wings. Splashes of red and blue are found on the top while the bottom holds small figure cut outs.

Because the forest is so densely grown with thistles and thorns, I had to send my slaves ahead of me with axes to hack out an opening for me to uncover specimens. Feet don't fail me now Take me to the finish line. Oh, my heart, it breaks every step that I take, But I'm hoping at the gates, they'll tell me that you're mine, 2020, Xerox collage and ink on watercolor paper, 47" x 51." Photo courtesy of the artist.

Two project installation on two walls. The one on the left depicts a white shirt dressed figure with their back to the viewer, the one on the right shows a red background and golden deteriorating roses being reach by a hand.

Installation view of Eurydice, at EXPO Chicago, Chicago, 2018. Photo courtesy of the artist.

Images on a wall showcase various figures and faces screaming. In the center of them all, a collage of an eye covered by screaming faces and a bloodied figures.

Pins and Needles, 2016, vinyl adhesive on plexiglass, fluorescent light, 48" x 90." Photo courtesy of the artist.

Three white walls hold each images. On the left a small octagon depicting mouths, in the middle wall a collage of various faces and red lips centers a figure and on the right wall a patchwork of various faces.

Installation view of Soft Colony, at Night Gallery, Los Angeles, 2016. Photo courtesy of the artist.